Allegory of the Cave
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Allegory of the Cave
04-03-2012, 04:46 PM
Post: #1
Allegory of the Cave
This is more a test to make sure I got this correct.

The Allegory of the Cave—also known as the Analogy of the Cave, Plato's Cave, or the Parable of the Cave—is an allegory used by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work The Republic to illustrate "our nature in its education and want of education" (514a). It is written as a fictional dialogue between Plato's teacher Socrates and Plato's brother Glaucon at the beginning of Book VII (chapter IX in Robin Waterfield's translation) (514a–520a). The Allegory of the Cave is presented after the metaphor of the sun (507b–509c) and the analogy of the divided line (509d–513e). Allegories are summarized in the viewpoint of dialectic at the end of Book VII and VIII (531d–534e).

Plato lets Socrates describe a group of people who have lived chained to the wall of a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall. The people watch shadows projected on the wall by things passing in front of a fire behind them, and begin to ascribe forms to these shadows. According to Plato's Socrates, the shadows are as close as the prisoners get to viewing reality. He then explains how the philosopher is like a prisoner who is freed from the cave and comes to understand that the shadows on the wall do not make up reality at all, as he can perceive the true form of reality rather than the mere shadows seen by the prisoners.

The Allegory is related to Plato's Theory of Forms, according to which the "Forms" (or "Ideas"), and not the material world of change known to us through sensation, possess the highest and most fundamental kind of reality. Only knowledge of the Forms constitutes real knowledge.[1] In addition, the Allegory of the Cave is an attempt to explain the philosopher's place in society: to attempt to enlighten the "prisoners". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_of_the_Cave

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04-03-2012, 04:52 PM
Post: #2
RE: Allegory of the Cave
(04-03-2012 04:46 PM)Marc Stevens Wrote:  This is more a test to make sure I got this correct.

Nope. You got it wrong. Plato didn't invent the internet, Allegory did. (Or is that what you were saying and I just missed it?)

- NonEleglorious

- NonE .).

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04-03-2012, 05:32 PM
Post: #3
RE: Allegory of the Cave
(04-03-2012 04:46 PM)Marc Stevens Wrote:  This is more a test to make sure I got this correct.

I will go over my philosophy stuff and let you know if you left out any important nuances, but that seems about right.

He's noble enough to know what's right
But weak enough not to choose it
He's wise enough to win the world
But fool enough to lose it
He's a New World man - Rush
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04-03-2012, 05:46 PM
Post: #4
RE: Allegory of the Cave
What I meant was setting up the forum category so we could finally post here. I did it correctly, I think.Confused

If government services were valuable and the market wanted them, they wouldn't be provided on a compulsory basis.
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04-03-2012, 07:08 PM (This post was last modified: 04-03-2012 07:15 PM by Dionysus.)
Post: #5
RE: Allegory of the Cave
^^ Silly me. Then I won't bother saying that what Plato was getting at was that we are the prisoners in the cave, that our opinions and beliefs are merely distorted shadows of the truth, and that it's the philosopher/enlightened person alone who sees the shining realm of truth and freedom above this shadow world, and they have a moral imperative to try to lead the masses to the same enlightenment, to get the cave prisoners to come out and risk exposure to the sunlight of knowing and deciding for themselves, to free them from the programmed illusions of the past despite how frightening it may be.

Then again, it could just be a boring story about some idiots in a cave. Tounge

He's noble enough to know what's right
But weak enough not to choose it
He's wise enough to win the world
But fool enough to lose it
He's a New World man - Rush
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04-04-2012, 04:23 AM
Post: #6
RE: Allegory of the Cave
Ya, at least more correct than not. A bit unwieldy to have on sub-forum the same name as the main-forum, but it's functional and that's what really matters.

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04-04-2012, 06:13 AM
Post: #7
RE: Allegory of the Cave
(04-04-2012 04:23 AM)WorBlux Wrote:  A bit unwieldy to have on sub-forum the same name as the main-forum, but it's functional and that's what really matters.
Just to expound upon what WorBlux is noting:
Marc Stevens' Adventures in Legal Land / Philosophy & Psychology / Philosophy & Psychology / Allegory of the Cave

(from my perspective, I'd say there are now two sub-forums with the identical name, with one under the other aka redundant) Wink

The order I'm seeing would easily enough appear by simply renaming the second Philosophy & Psychology branch to simply Philosophy, then setting up a second one at that same level titled simply Psychology.

Free forum software --sounds like such fun (but at least unlike Bureaucrat Authors, they're not forcing anyone to use, much less pay for theirs!).
Cool

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07-10-2012, 06:12 PM
Post: #8
RE: Allegory of the Cave
Unfortunately Plato isn't around to ask directly...

The best interpretation or retelling of the allegory that I've seen is the Matrix part 1. Although, the ending is a bit different (thanks hollywood), and 'perhaps' better told if the basic human creature would, when freed, instead of running back screaming into the cave, instead decided to live in the 'brave new world' (so to speak)...perhaps the modern telling is an appeal to what humanity should aspire to be...instead of what it actually is.
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03-28-2013, 10:07 AM
Post: #9
RE: Allegory of the Cave
(04-03-2012 04:46 PM)Marc Stevens Wrote:  This is more a test to make sure I got this correct.

The Allegory of the Cave—also known as the Analogy of the Cave, Plato's Cave, or the Parable of the Cave—is an allegory used by the Greek philosopher Plato in his work The Republic to illustrate "our nature in its education and want of education" (514a). It is written as a fictional dialogue between Plato's teacher Socrates and Plato's brother Glaucon at the beginning of Book VII (chapter IX in Robin Waterfield's translation) (514a–520a). The Allegory of the Cave is presented after the metaphor of the sun (507b–509c) and the analogy of the divided line (509d–513e). Allegories are summarized in the viewpoint of dialectic at the end of Book VII and VIII (531d–534e).

Plato lets Socrates describe a group of people who have lived chained to the wall of a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall. The people watch shadows projected on the wall by things passing in front of a fire behind them, and begin to ascribe forms to these shadows. According to Plato's Socrates, the shadows are as close as the prisoners get to viewing reality. He then explains how the philosopher is like a prisoner who is freed from the cave and comes to understand that the shadows on the wall do not make up reality at all, as he can perceive the true form of reality rather than the mere shadows seen by the prisoners.

The Allegory is related to Plato's Theory of Forms, according to which the "Forms" (or "Ideas"), and not the material world of change known to us through sensation, possess the highest and most fundamental kind of reality. Only knowledge of the Forms constitutes real knowledge.[1] In addition, the Allegory of the Cave is an attempt to explain the philosopher's place in society: to attempt to enlighten the "prisoners". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_of_the_Cave


I believe that one of the most important parts of this Allegory is the third part, the 'Return to the Cave.'

Return to the cave

Socrates next asks Glaucon to consider the condition of this man. "Wouldn't he remember his first home, what passed for wisdom there, and his fellow prisoners, and consider himself happy and them pitiable? And wouldn't he disdain whatever honors, praises, and prizes were awarded there to the ones who guessed best which shadows followed which? Moreover, were he to return there, wouldn't he be rather bad at their game, no longer being accustomed to the darkness? Wouldn't it be said of him that he went up and came back with his eyes corrupted, and that it's not even worth trying to go up? And if they were somehow able to get their hands on and kill the man who attempts to release and lead them up, wouldn't they kill him?" (517a) The prisoners, ignorant of the world behind them, would see the freed man with his corrupted eyes and be afraid of anything but what they already know. Philosophers analyzing the allegory argue that the prisoners would ironically find the freed man stupid due to the current state of his eyes and temporarily not being able to see the shadows which are the world to the prisoners.


So it seems to be saying that those ideas which would 'free' someone would sound stupid.

So for all of those who are thinking and saying that the ideas of some in here sound stupid, maybe you might have another look?

What makes you think that having hung around with and being taught by the other prisoners all your life that you would even recognise something useful/intelligent/correct?

Again I quote Vernon Howard -

"Do you want to hear something which is good for you? You do not know what is good for you!"

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08-13-2013, 08:47 AM
Post: #10
RE: Allegory of the Cave
[Image: wpid-aldous-huxley-the-real-hopele26-victims.jpg]

- NonE

- NonE .).

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